Public Release: 

Amygdala and memory

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences

In a memory retrieval task in which 14 participants, 20-54 years of age, viewed a series of nonemotional images, half of which were immediately followed by electrical stimulation of the participants' amygdala, a brain region involved in prioritizing memories, researchers found that the participants exhibited improved memory in next-day memory recognition tests for the images that were followed by amygdala stimulation, compared with control images, findings with implications for the development of memory enhancement therapies.

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Article #17-14058: "Direct electrical stimulation of the amygdala enhances declarative memory in humans," by Cory Inman et al.

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