Public Release: 

American Heart Association Population Research Prize goes to Kentucky scientist for studies creating 'highly relevant' new understanding of cardiovascular disease

American Heart Association

ANAHEIM, California, Nov. 13 - The American Heart Association awarded its Population Research Prize for 2017 to Donna R. Arnett, Ph.D., of the University of Kentucky, Lexington, "for insightful research successfully blending the basic molecular sciences with population studies to produce a highly relevant new understanding of major aspects of cardiovascular disease including risk prediction, hypertension and heart failure."

Arnett, Dean of the College of Public Health and Professor at the University, received the prize during Sunday's opening of the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2017, a premier global exchange of the latest advances in cardiovascular science for researchers and clinicians, which was held at the Anaheim Convention Center. Association President John Warner, M.D., of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center presented the prize, a citation and $5,000 honorarium. The annual prize honors important studies of cardiovascular disease patterns in populations.

"Throughout her praise-worthy career, Dr. Arnett has worked to integrate molecular science with population studies, using her extensive training in both disciplines, to produce broadly relevant results for the health of the public," Warner said.

"Her personal success is evident in both her publication record and her funding," he noted.. "She has published more than 500 peer-reviewed reports in high-impact journals in multiple fields, including seminal work she has led identifying genetic biomarkers and in risk prediction, hypertension, heart failure, imaging and methods development."

Arnett also has played a key role in the development of the population research portfolio of the American Heart Association, where she served as a bridge between the population and molecular research communities, Warner said, adding: "Her many years of service have included time as a high-profile role model for population research during her presidency of this Association, in 2012-2013."

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Statements and conclusions of study authors that are presented at American Heart Association scientific meetings are solely those of the study authors and do not necessarily reflect association policy or position. The association makes no representation or warranty as to their accuracy or reliability. The association receives funding primarily from individuals; foundations and corporations (including pharmaceutical, device manufacturers and other companies) also make donations and fund specific association programs and events. The association has strict policies to prevent these relationships from influencing the science content. Revenues from pharmaceutical and device corporations are available at http://www.heart.org/corporatefunding.

About the American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is devoted to saving people from heart disease and stroke - the two leading causes of death in the world. We team with millions of volunteers to fund innovative research, fight for stronger public health policies and provide lifesaving tools and information to prevent and treat these diseases. The Dallas-based association is the nation's oldest and largest voluntary organization dedicated to fighting heart disease and stroke. To learn more or to get involved, call 1-800-AHA-USA1, visit heart.org or call any of our offices around the country. Follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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