Public Release: 

NASA sees Typhoon Noru over southern Japan

NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

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IMAGE: On Aug. 7 at 12:25 a.m. EDT (04:25 UTC) NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Typhoon Noru over Japan. view more 

Credit: Credits: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

Typhoon Noru was moving over Honshu, Japan when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead on August 7. Noru made landfall in the central prefecture of Wakayama early in the day.

The Aqua satellite passed over Japan on August 7 at 12:25 a.m. EDT (0425 UTC) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard captured a visible image of Typhoon Noru. Noru was still maintaining typhoon-force as it made landfall in Honshu. In the satellite image, the storm did appear somewhat elongated from northwest to southeast.

On August 7 Japan at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC) Typhoon Noru was located over Honshu, about 150 miles east of Iwakuni. It was centered near 34.0 degrees north latitude and 135.1 degrees east longitude. Noru was moving to the northeast at 13.8 mph (12 knots/22 kph) and had maximum sustained winds near 75 mph (65 knots/120 kph).

Warnings are in effect in throughout central Japan. For updated warnings visit the Japan Meteorological Agency website: http://www.jma.go.jp/en

Noru is the Korean word for a type of deer, and the storm is moving northeast. The storm is forecast to move over land and pass west of Toyko while on a northeast track. Noru is forecast to re-emerge over the Pacific Ocean by August 9 and turn extra-tropical.

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By Rob Gutro
NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

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