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Showing releases 1-25 out of 35.

1 | 2 > >>

Public Release: 20-Nov-2018
Energy Policy
Explaining the plummeting cost of solar power
The dramatic drop in the cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) modules, which has fallen by 99 percent over the last four decades, is often touted as a major success story for renewable energy technology. But one question has never been fully addressed: What exactly accounts for that stunning drop? A new analysis by MIT researchers has pinpointed what caused the savings, including the policies and technology changes that mattered most.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Nov-2018
Eight Los Alamos projects win R&D 100 Awards
Eight Los Alamos National Laboratory technologies won R&D 100 Awards at R&D Magazine's annual ceremony in Orlando, Florida. Three of the inventions also won Special Recognition Awards, including a Gold award for corporate social responsibility.

Contact: Nick Njegomir
njegomir@lanl.gov
505-665-9394
DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Nov-2018
Four Argonne technologies receive 2018 R&D 100 Awards
Four Argonne research projects have earned R&D 100 Awards, long considered the 'Oscars' of scientific innovation.
United States Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Laboratory Directed Research and Development, National Nuclear Security Administration, Strategic Partnership Projects, Federal Emergency Management Agency,

Contact: Alex Mitchell
amitchell@anl.gov
630-252-5573
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Nov-2018
Nature Communications
Hidden giants in forest soils
Only a fraction of the microbes residing in, on and around soils have been identified through efforts to understand their contributions to global nutrient cycles. Soils are also home to countless viruses that can infect microbes, impacting their ability to regulate these global cycles. In Nature Communications, giant virus genomes have been discovered for the first time in a forest soil ecosystem by researchers from the DOE Joint Genome Institute and the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.
DOE/Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Nov-2018
Researcher gets $485,263 grant to study how to control materials moving through tiny spaces
Dr. Gangli Wang, professor of chemistry at Georgia State University, has received a three-year, $485,263 federal grant to study how nanostructured materials, or materials with hollow structures on the nanometer scale, affect how other substances pass through them.
US Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: LaTina Emerson
lemerson1@gsu.edu
404-413-1353
Georgia State University

Public Release: 19-Nov-2018
Applied Physics Letters
Making X-ray microscopy 10 times faster
NSLS-II's Full Field X-ray Imaging beamline can image samples in 3D faster than ever before.

Contact: Stephanie Kossman
skossman@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 19-Nov-2018
Nature Communications
Rare and diverse giant viruses unexpectedly found in a forest soil ecosystem
Until recently, scientists thought of viruses as mostly small infectious agents, tiny compared to typical bacteria and human cells. So imagine the surprise when biologist Jeff Blanchard and Ph.D. student Lauren Alteio at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with others at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Joint Genome Institute (JGI), discovered giant viruses -- relatively speaking the size of Macy's parade day balloons -- in soil at Harvard Forest in Petersham, Massachusetts.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Science Graduate Student Research

Contact: Janet Lathrop
jlathrop@umass.edu
413-545-2989
University of Massachusetts at Amherst

Public Release: 19-Nov-2018
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
Major natural carbon sink may soon become carbon source
Peatlands in some parts of the world, including Canada, Siberia and Southeast Asia, have already turned into significant carbon sources. The same fate may be coming soon for the Peruvian peatlands.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kayla Zacharias
kzachar@purdue.edu
765-494-9318
Purdue University

Public Release: 16-Nov-2018
Science Advances
Treated superalloys demonstrate unprecedented heat resistance
Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have discovered how to make 'superalloys' even more super, extending useful life by thousands of hours. The discovery could improve materials performance for electrical generators and nuclear reactors.

Contact: Nicole Stricker
nicole.stricker@inl.gov
208-526-5955
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

Public Release: 16-Nov-2018
DOE grant aimed at improving process to reduce nuclear fuel waste
An $800,000 grant from the US Department of Energy will allow Penn State researchers to investigate a new approach for removing rare-earth fission products from the molten salt baths where used nuclear fuel is electro-refined to recycle uranium and minimize nuclear waste.
US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 16-Nov-2018
Global Change Biology
PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests
Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling shows.
US Department of Energy, US Department of Agriculture

Contact: Polly Buotte
buottep@oregonstate.edu
406-589-6863
Oregon State University

Public Release: 16-Nov-2018
Scientific Reports
Scientists produce 3D chemical maps of single bacteria
Researchers at NSLS-II used ultrabright x-rays to generate 3D nanoscale maps of a single bacteria's chemical composition with unparalleled spatial resolution.
DOE's Office of Science, National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation

Contact: Stephanie Kossman
skossman@bnl.gov
631-344-8671
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 15-Nov-2018
Argonne's Min Si receives early career award from IEEE Computer Society
Argonne's Min Si wins Award for Excellence for Early Career Researchers in High Performance Computing through the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.
US Department of Energy, Advanced Scientific Computing Research

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Nov-2018
Arizona State professor wins grants to elucidate the magic of proteins
For Arizona State University's Dmitry Matyushov, professor in the School of Molecular Sciences and the Department of Physics, years of studying how electrons make their way through some important protein molecules has been recently rewarded with two major grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Department of Energy (DOE).
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Jenny Green
jenny.green@asu.edu
480-965-1340
Arizona State University

Public Release: 14-Nov-2018
Nature Energy
Next-gen batteries possible with new engineering approach
Dramatically longer-lasting, faster-charging and safer lithium metal batteries may be possible, according to Penn State research, recently published in Nature Energy.
US Department of Energy

Contact: A'ndrea Elyse Messer
aem1@psu.edu
814-865-9481
Penn State

Public Release: 14-Nov-2018
Nature Ecology and Evolution
Symbiosis a driver of truffle diversity
Truffles are the fruiting bodies of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal symbionts residing on host plant roots. In many Ascomycota and Basidiomycota lineages, truffle-forming species have evolved independently in nearly every major group. This suggests that symbiosis drives evolution of truffle diversity and selects for specific traits. As reported in Nature Ecology & Evolution, an international team sought insights into the ECM lifestyle of truffle-forming species, conducting a comparative analysis of eight Pezizomycete fungi.
Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: David Gilbert
degilbert@lbl.gov
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 14-Nov-2018
Atmosphere
Middle Eastern desert dust on the Tibetan plateau could affect the Indian summer monsoon
Large quantities dust from the deserts of the Middle East can settle on the Tibetan Plateau, darkening the region's snowpack and accelerating snow melt. A new atmospheric modeling study suggests that, in some years, heavy springtime dust deposition can set off a series of feedbacks that intensify the Indian summer monsoon. The findings could explain a correlation between Tibetan snowpack and the Indian monsoon first observed by British meteorologist Henry Blanford in 1884.
NASA, US Department of Energy

Contact: Matthew Wright
mewright@umd.edu
301-405-9267
University of Maryland

Public Release: 14-Nov-2018
Nature
Climate simulations project wetter, windier hurricanes
New supercomputer simulations by climate scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have shown that climate change intensified the amount of rainfall in recent hurricanes such as Katrina, Irma, and Maria by 5 to 10 percent. They further found that if those hurricanes were to occur in a future world that is warmer than present, those storms would have even more rainfall and stronger winds.
Department of Energy

Contact: Julie Chao
jhchao@lbl.gov
510-486-6491
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Nov-2018
eLife
Visualizing 'unfurling' microtubule growth
Living cells depend absolutely on microtubules that form a scaffolding for moving materials inside the cell. Microtubule fibers are hollow rods made of much smaller tubulin subunits that spontaneously assemble at one end of the rod, but exactly how they do this inside the crowded environment of living cells has been a mystery. Now researchers at UC Davis have uncovered the mechanism that puts these blocks in place, illustrated in a new animation.
National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy Office of Science

Contact: Andy Fell
ahfell@ucdavis.edu
530-752-4533
University of California - Davis

Public Release: 13-Nov-2018
GE Hitachi awarded subcontract for work supporting proposed versatile test reactor
Idaho National Laboratory has awarded a subcontract to GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy to support the conceptual design, cost/schedule estimate and safety framework activities for a proposed fast spectrum Versatile Test Reactor (VTR), critical for the development of innovative nuclear fuels, materials, instrumentation and sensors.
U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Versatile Test Reactor Program

Contact: Kortny Rolson-Duce
kortny.rolston-duce@inl.gov
208-522-4809
DOE/Idaho National Laboratory

Public Release: 13-Nov-2018
ACS Photonics
Detecting light in a different dimension
Scientists from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)--a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory--have dramatically improved the response of graphene to light through self-assembling wire-like nanostructures that conduct electricity.
Department of Energy

Contact: Ariana Tantillo
atantillo@bnl.gov
631-344-2347
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2018
INCITE grants awarded to 62 computational research projects
The US Department of Energy announced new projects for 2019 through its Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program.
Advanced Scientific Computing Research

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2018
60th American Physical Society-Department of Plasma Physics annual meeting
From the cosmos to fusion plasmas, PPPL presents findings at global APS gathering
Piece summarizes invited PPPL talks ranging from fusion to astrophysics at 60th APS-DPP annual meeting.

Contact: John Greenwald
jgreenwa@pppl.gov
609-243-2672
DOE/Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

Public Release: 12-Nov-2018
Macromolecules
Scientists bring polymers into atomic-scale focus
A Berkeley Lab-led research has adapted a powerful electron-based imaging technique to obtain a first-of-its-kind image of atomic-scale structure in a synthetic polymer. The research could ultimately inform polymer fabrication methods and lead to new designs for materials and devices that incorporate polymers.

Contact: Glenn Roberts Jr.
GERoberts@lbl.gov
510-486-5582
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Public Release: 9-Nov-2018
Argonne's Raj Kettimuthu named ACM Distinguished Member
Argonne computer scientist Raj Kettimuthu recently was named a Distinguished Member of the Association for Computing Machinery for his development of tools to analyze and enhance end-to-end data transfer performance.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

Showing releases 1-25 out of 35.

1 | 2 > >>

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