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NEWS FROM UNIVERSITIES AND OTHER DOE RESEARCH PARTNERS

Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 271.

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Public Release: 19-Jul-2018
Science
Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern
An international team of scientists has discovered a new, exotic form of insulating material with a metallic surface that could enable more efficient electronics or even quantum computing. The researchers developed a new method for analyzing existing chemical compounds that relies on the mathematical properties like symmetry that govern the repeating patterns seen in everyday wallpaper.
Simons Foundation Nordita, European Research Council, US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Packard Foundation, Schmidt Fund for Innovative Research, National Natural Science Foundation of China

Contact: Liz Fuller-Wright
lizfw@princeton.edu
609-258-5729
Princeton University

Public Release: 19-Jul-2018
Department of Energy invests $64 million in advanced nuclear technology
The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced nearly $64 million in awards for advanced nuclear energy technology to DOE national laboratories, industry, and 39 U.S. universities in 29 states. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute has been awarded $800,000 for analysis of nuclear power plants' accident propagation and mitigation processes.
US Department of Energy

Contact: News Media
newsmedia@rpi.edu
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 18-Jul-2018
Physical Review Applied
Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says
Your everyday permanent markers, glue sticks and packing tape may offer a surprisingly low-tech solution to a long-standing nuisance in the manufacturing industry: Making soft and ductile, or so-called 'gummy' metals easier to cut.
US Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Kayla Wiles
wiles5@purdue.edu
765-494-2432
Purdue University

Public Release: 18-Jul-2018
Proceedings of the Royal Society A
Study finds climate determines shapes of river basins
Short and squat, or long and thin? An MIT study finds climate determines a river basin's shape.
DOE/Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division

Contact: Sarah McDonnell
s_mcd@mit.edu
617-253-8923
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 16-Jul-2018
Nature Materials
In borophene, boundaries are no barrier
Defects are often observed when making borophene, the single-atom form of boron, but unlike in other two-dimensional materials, these mismatched lattices can assemble into ordered structures that preserve the material's metallic nature and electronic properties. Labs at Rice and Northwestern universities made the first detailed analysis of borophene defects.
Office of Naval Research, National Science Foundation Materials Research Science and Engineering Center, Army Research Office, Robert Welch Foundation, DOE/Office of Science, State Key Laboratory of Mechanics and Control of Mechanical Structures

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 16-Jul-2018
Nature Microbiology
Getting to know the microbes that drive climate change
A new understanding of the microbes and viruses in the thawing permafrost in Sweden may help scientists better predict the pace of climate change.
US Department of Energy, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, National Science Foundation

Contact: Virginia Rich
Rich.270@osu.edu
614-247-1622
Ohio State University

Public Release: 16-Jul-2018
Nature
Single-celled architects inspire new nanotechnology
ASU professor Hao Yan and his colleagues have designed a range of nanostructures resembling marine diatoms -- tiny unicellular creatures. To achieve this, they borrow techniques used by naturally-occurring diatoms to deposit layers of silica -- the primary constituent in glass -- in order to grow their intricate shells. Using a technique known as DNA origami, the group designed nanoscale platforms of various shapes to which particles of silica, drawn by electrical charge, could stick.
National Science Foundation of China, National Key R&D Program of China, Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences, CAS, US National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, National Institutes of Health, US Department of Energy

Contact: Skip Derra
Skip.Derra@asu.edu
Arizona State University

Public Release: 12-Jul-2018
Physical Review Letters
In search of dark matter
An international team of scientists that includes UC Riverside physicist Hai-Bo Yu has imposed conditions on how dark matter may interact with ordinary matter. In the search for direct detection of dark matter, the experimental focus has been on WIMPs, or weakly interacting massive particles, the hypothetical particles thought to make up dark matter. But the research team invokes a different theory to challenge the WIMP paradigm: the self-interacting dark matter model, or SIDM.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 12-Jul-2018
Science
VERITAS supplies critical piece to neutrino discovery puzzle
The VERITAS array has confirmed the detection of high-energy gamma rays from the vicinity of a supermassive black hole located in a distant galaxy, TXS 0506+056. While these detections are relatively common for VERITAS, this black hole is potentially the first known astrophysical source of high-energy cosmic neutrinos, a type of ghostly subatomic particle that can be made at astrophysical sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy, Smithsonian Institution, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada

Contact: Lisa Potter
Lisa.potter@utah.edu
949-533-7899
University of Utah

Public Release: 9-Jul-2018
Materials Science and Engineering A
New microscopy works at extreme heat, sheds light on alloys for nuclear reactors
A new microscopy technique allows researchers to track microstructural changes in real time, even when a material is exposed to extreme heat and stress. Recently, researchers show that a stainless steel alloy called alloy 709 has potential for elevated temperature applications such as nuclear reactor structures.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Matt Shipman
matt_shipman@ncsu.edu
919-515-6386
North Carolina State University

Public Release: 6-Jul-2018
A structured solution
The University of Pittsburgh's Swanson School of Engineering will be the lead investigator on a $1 million Department of Energy (DOE) award to advance design and manufacture of nuclear plant components via additive manufacturing. The award is part of the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program.
US Department of Energy, DOE/Office of Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program

Contact: Paul Kovach
pkovach@pitt.edu
412-624-0265
University of Pittsburgh

Public Release: 5-Jul-2018
Science
'Molecular movie' captures chemical reaction on atomic scale
A team of physicists from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Stanford University and Europe has captured the clearest glimpse yet of a photochemical reaction -- the type of light-fueled molecular transformations responsible for photosynthesis, vision and the ozone layer. Appearing in the June 6 edition of the journal Science, the team's study marks the culmination of a years-long effort to advance the quality of 'molecular movies' from that of a rudimentary stop-motion animation to a high-definition motion picture.
US Department of Energy, National Science Foundation

Contact: Martin Centurion
martin.centurion@unl.edu
402-472-5810
University of Nebraska-Lincoln

Public Release: 29-Jun-2018
Research center at UC Riverside receives additional funding from Department of Energy
The Spins and Heat in Nanoscale Electronic Systems center, known as SHINES, at the University of California, Riverside, has received funding for two more years from the Department of Energy. SHINES received $12 million from the department in 2014. The new funding of $1.9 million is part of $100 million in funding for 42 Energy Frontier Research Centers, or EFRCs, that Secretary of Energy Rick Perry announced today.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Iqbal Pittalwala
iqbal@ucr.edu
951-827-6050
University of California - Riverside

Public Release: 29-Jun-2018
MSU researcher earns US Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career award
An MSU researcher has received a US Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Early Career Research Program award. Jaideep Singh, an MSU assistant professor of physics at the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, was selected by the Office of Nuclear Physics to receive funding for his proposal, 'Towards a Next Generation Search for Time-Reversal Violation Using Optically Addressable Nuclei in Cryogenic Solids.'
US Department of Energy

Contact: Karen King
kingk@frib.msu.edu
517-908-7262
Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

Public Release: 25-Jun-2018
DOE funds field test of Rice's solar desalination technology
The Department of Energy has awarded $1.7 million to a Rice University-led team for further development and field testing of an innovative desalination technology that uses nanoparticles and sunlight to treat water.
DOE/Solar Energy Technologies Office

Contact: Jade Boyd
jadeboyd@rice.edu
713-348-6778
Rice University

Public Release: 22-Jun-2018
Rice University's Ming Tang earns early career award
Ming Tang, a materials scientist at Rice University, has been awarded a Department of Energy Early Career Research Program grant to study instability mechanisms observed in the electrodeposition of active metals.
US Department of Energy

Contact: David Ruth
david@rice.edu
713-348-6327
Rice University

Public Release: 20-Jun-2018
MSU professor awarded grant to harvest medical isotopes at FRIB
The US Department of Energy Office of Science's Office of Nuclear Physics awarded the 'Isotope Development and Production for Research and Applications' grant to a Michigan State University (MSU) chemistry professor. It is a two-year $356,598 grant.
US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Physics

Contact: KAREN KING
kingk@frib.msu.edu
517-908-7262
Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams

Public Release: 19-Jun-2018
Nature Photonics
Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?
A new material developed by scientists at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and the University of Wisconsin along with researchers from Air Force Research Laboratories, University of Missouri, and J.A. Woollam Co. Inc, might show promise for such infrared detection applications as autonomous vehicles, emergency services and even manufacturing.
Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Link Foundation Energy Fellowship, Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, National Science Foundation, Department of Energy, DOE/Basic Energy Sciences

Contact: Amy Blumenthal
amyblume@usc.edu
917-710-1897
University of Southern California

Public Release: 19-Jun-2018
Environmental Research Letters
Study: Climate action can limit Asia's growing water shortages
Even 'modest' action to limit climate change could help prevent the most extreme water-shortage scenarios facing Asia by the year 2050, according to a new study led by MIT researchers.
US Department of Energy, MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

Contact: Abby Abazorius
abbya@mit.edu
617-253-2709
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 19-Jun-2018
Physical Review Letters
The first experimental discovery in the world of the propagation of plasma turbulence
The research group of NIFS together with collaborators in the United States applied the 'heat pulse modulation method' in the magnetic island produced intentionally in the tokamak 'Doublet III-D.' Temperature gradient inherent in the magnetically confined plasma causes turbulence while there is no turbulence in the magnetic island because of the absence of the gradient. That the turbulence propagates has now been demonstrated for the first time by investigating turbulence in the magnetic island.
Formation of International Scientific Base and Network program of NIFS/NINS, US Department of Energy

Contact: Katsumi Ida
ida.katsumi@nifs.ac.jp
81-572-582-182
National Institutes of Natural Sciences

Public Release: 19-Jun-2018
Joule
Sodium- and potassium-based batteries hold promise for cheap energy storage
Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have found new evidence suggesting that batteries based on sodium and potassium hold promise as a potential alternative to lithium-based batteries.
National Science Foundation, US Department of Energy

Contact: Josh Brown
josh.brown@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-0500
Georgia Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Jun-2018
RSC Advances
'Artificial blubber' protects divers in frigid water
A treatment that infuses a conventional neoprene wetsuit with a heavy inert gas can improve a diver's survival time in frigid waters by a factor of three, according to scientists and others.
US Office of Naval Research, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, US Department of Energy

Contact: Karl-Lydie Jean-Baptiste
kjeanbap@mit.edu
617-253-1682
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Public Release: 18-Jun-2018
Nature Biotechnology
New DNA synthesis technique promises rapid, high-fidelity DNA printing
Today, DNA is synthesized as an organic chemist would, using toxic chemicals and error-prone steps that limit accuracy and thus length to about 200 base pairs. UC Berkeley and Berkeley Lab researchers have adapted a human enzyme that makes DNA in water to a repetitive process for adding base pairs. Initial tests show that the technique promises to make oligonucleotides 10 times longer, the size of small genes, faster, cheaper and without toxic waste.
US Department of Energy

Contact: Robert Sanders
rlsanders@berkeley.edu
510-643-6998
University of California - Berkeley

Public Release: 15-Jun-2018
Professor Emily Liu receives $1.8 million DOE award for solar power systems research
Li (Emily) Liu, associate professor of nuclear engineering and engineering physics in the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has been selected by the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) to receive a $1.8 million award to study high-temperature molten-salt properties and corrosion mechanisms.
US Department of Energy, Solar Energy Technologies Office

Contact: News Media
newsmedia@rpi.edu
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

Public Release: 12-Jun-2018
UC San Diego engineer receives award to advance concentrating solar power research
Renkun Chen, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of California San Diego, has received a $1.18 million dollar award from the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Office to develop technology that can advance next-generation concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. The project is aimed at developing an ultra-sensitive infrared camera that can rapidly measure and monitor heat transfer in CSP plant materials and assess their performance over decades of use.
US Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Office

Contact: Liezel Labios
llabios@ucsd.edu
858-246-1124
University of California - San Diego

Showing releases 1-25 out of 271.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>

 

 

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