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Features Archive


Showing stories 1-25 out of 997 stories.
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16-May-2018
X-ray laser reveals ultrafast dance of liquid water

Researchers have probed the movements of molecules in liquid water that occur in less than 100 millionths of a billionth of a second, or femtoseconds.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-May-2018
Scientists turn X-ray laser into World's fastest water heater
Scientists have used a powerful X-ray laser at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to heat water from room temperature to 100,000 degrees Celsius in less than a tenth of a picosecond, or millionth of a millionth of a second.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

15-May-2018
SLAC will open one of three NIH National Service Centers for Cryo-Electron Microscopy
The National Institutes of Health announced today that it will establish a national service and training center for cryogenic electron microscopy research at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

14-May-2018
Made in the USA
'Made in the USA.' That can now be said of the radioactive isotope molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), last made in the United States in the late 1980s. Its short-lived decay product, technetium-99m (Tc-99m), is the most widely used radioisotope in medical diagnostic imaging. Tc-99m is best known for imaging blood flow in a cardiac nuclear stress test.

Contact: Dawn Levy
levyd@ornl.gov
865-576-6448
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

14-May-2018
Planck collaboration wins 2018 Gruber Cosmology Prize
The Planck Team -- including researchers in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (Berkeley Lab's) Computational Research and Physics divisions--have been awarded the 2018 Gruber Cosmology Prize.

Contact: Linda Vu
lvu@lbl.gov
510-495-2402
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

13-May-2018
Quark Matter 2018: Nuclear physicists gather to discuss fundamental particle interactions
Nuclear physicists from around the world seeking to understand the intricate details of the building blocks of visible matter are meeting in Venice, Italy, May 13-19, to discuss the latest results and theoretical interpretations of data from the world's premiere collider facilities.

Contact: Karen McNulty Walsh
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
631-344-8350
DOE/Brookhaven National Laboratory

10-May-2018
Taking the stress out of residual stress mapping
Researchers from the University of Virginia are using neutrons to explore fundamental work in residual stress mapping that promises more precise science down the road for Oak Ridge National Laboratory and similar facilities around the world. The UVA team's research will provide insight into the accuracy of residual stress mapping measurements in such materials when the neutron beam must travel large distances through the sample.

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-May-2018
Whistler waves appear to scatter runaway electrons in fusion plasmas
When whistler waves are present in a fusion plasma, runaway electrons pay attention. A research team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory is the first to directly observe the elusive waves inside a highly energized magnetic field as electrons zoom around the plasma. Using sophisticated technologies, the team made direct measurements of whistler waves produced when a laboratory plasma becomes unstable and generates runaway electrons.

Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

9-May-2018
SLAC's X-ray laser opens new view on proteins related to Alzheimer's disease
An international research team has come up with a new method with potential for revealing the structure of individual amyloid fibrils with powerful beams of X-ray laser light.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-May-2018
Ultrafast atomic snapshots reveal energy flow in superconductor
A team including SLAC researchers has measured the intricate interactions between atomic nuclei and electrons that are key to understanding intriguing materials properties, such as high-temperature superconductivity.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

2-May-2018
Shake rattle and code
Tom Jordan and a team from the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) are using the supercomputing resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), a US Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility, to advance modeling for the study of earthquake risk and how to reduce it.

Contact: Brian Grabowski
bgrabowski@anl.gov
630-252-1232
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

2-May-2018
PSI researchers seek existence of exotic quantum spin ice
Researchers from the Paul Sherrer Institute are studying a fascinating sample using neutrons at ORNL's Spallation Neutron Source. Their goal is to create an observable case of quantum spin ice, a bizarre magnetic state found in a special class of materials that could lead to advances in quantum computing.

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

1-May-2018
U of C student receives 2018 Rosalind Franklin Investigator Award
A University of Chicago graduate student in Biophysical Sciences has received the 2018 Rosalind Franklin Investigator Award from the Advanced Photon Source Users Organization.

Contact: Karen Mellen
kmellen@anl.gov
630-252-5325
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

1-May-2018
Scientists find a new way to make novel materials by 'un-squeezing'
Researchers at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have found a way to create the equivalent of negative pressure by mixing two materials together under just the right conditions to make an alloy with an airier and entirely different crystal structure and unique properties.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

27-Apr-2018
Argonne's exemplary student research program inspires girls to join the sciences

Now in its seventh year, this educational program encourages high school students to work with Argonne scientists. In 2018, students from Aqsa School investigated lithium-ion batteries at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source.


Contact: Justin H.S. Breaux
jbreaux@anl.gov
630-252-5274
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

26-Apr-2018
X-ray scientists create tiny, super-thin sheets of flowing water that shimmer like soap bubbles
A team led by scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory turned tiny liquid jets that carry samples into the path of an X-ray beam into thin, free-flowing sheets, 100 times thinner than any produced before. They're so thin that X-rays pass through them unhindered, so images of the samples they carry come out clear.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

25-Apr-2018
Unusual magnetic structure may support next-generation technology
Researchers from Colorado State University are using neutrons to study a material with an unusual magnetic structure. This research could both enhance their team's fundamental understanding of frustrated magnetism and lead to improvements in digital information storage.

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

24-Apr-2018
Cracking the catalytic code

In a variety of research programs, Argonne experts are finding ways to make cheaper and more efficient the manufacture of products derived from shale gas deposits and identifying new routes to higher-performance.


Contact: Alex Mitchell
amitchell@anl.gov
630-252-5573
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

23-Apr-2018
Going with the hypersonic flow
Argonne researcher Alan Kastengren is using X-rays to delve deeply into complexity challenges related to supersonic combustion in hypersonic vehicles, one of the most complex flow problems in science. Working through Argonne's Advanced Photon Source and National Security Programs, he is helping clients like the Air Force Research Laboratory improve performance of the scramjet combustors that power hypersonic jets.

Contact: Chel Lancaster
chel@anl.gov
630-252-6138
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

23-Apr-2018
A SLAC legend gives the lab his lifetime collection of precious foils
Scientists who conduct experiments at the Stanford Radiation Synchrotron Lightsource (SSRL) have received an unusual and highly valuable gift -- a library of element calibration foils for a technique used to understand the structure of matter called X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

23-Apr-2018
Machine speak: Left to their own devices, computers can figure it out

Using novel machine learning techniques, a research team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory is teaching electronic devices how to speak for themselves.


Contact: Sara Shoemaker
shoemakerms@ornl.gov
865-576-9219
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19-Apr-2018
Muons spin tales of undiscovered particles

US Department of Energy (DOE) scientists are collaborating to test a magnetic property of the muon. The experiment could point to the existence of physics beyond our current understanding, including undiscovered particles.


Contact: Chel Lancaster
chel@anl.gov
630-252-6138
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

18-Apr-2018
Spinach used in neutron studies could unearth secret to stronger plant growth
Researchers from Uppsala University are using neutrons to study RuBisCO, an abundant enzyme essential to life on earth. They hope to determine how plants and other organisms use this enzyme to catalyze a reaction called carbon fixation that converts carbon dioxide into useful organic compounds.

Contact: Jeremy Rumsey
rumseyjp@ornl.gov
DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory

16-Apr-2018
Through thick and thin
Researchers solve a decades-old question: Is particle ordering responsible for the thickening of some industrial products when stirred rapidly? The answer brings us one step closer to solving complex industrial production problems.

Contact: DIana Anderson
ddanderson@anl.gov
630-252-4593
DOE/Argonne National Laboratory

16-Apr-2018
SLAC produces first electron beam with superconducting electron gun

Accelerator scientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are testing a new type of electron gun for a future generation of instruments that take snapshots of the atomic world in never-before-seen quality and detail, with applications in chemistry, biology, energy and materials science.


Contact: Andrew Gordon
agordon@slac.stanford.edu
650-926-2282
DOE/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

Showing stories 1-25 out of 997 stories.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 > >>


 

 

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