Contacts:

ACS Newsroom
newsroom@acs.org

Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455 (Cell)

San Francisco Press Center
April 2-5, 2017
415-978-3605

A full range of media resources will be available to assist in your coverage of the 253rd American Chemical Society national meeting, whether you are reporting onsite or from a remote location. There will be press releases and press conferences on abstracts chosen from more than 14,000 scientific presentations.

Watch live press conferences on YouTube at http://bit.ly/ ACSLive_SanFrancisco on Monday, April 3, through Wednesday, April 5. Anyone can view the briefings, but to chat, you must first sign in with a Google account.

Modern chemistry is a multi-disciplinary science, and the San Francisco meeting will include newsworthy topics spanning science's horizons. Thousands of scientists and others from around the world are expected to attend.

The American Chemical Society is a nonprofit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. With nearly 157,000 members, ACS is the world’s largest scientific society and a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-25 out of 25.

[ 1 ]

Research News Release

Public Release: 12-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Behavioral Brain Research
Research suggests potential therapy to prevent 'chemobrain' in cancer patients
Experiments showed that a compound called 'KU-32' prevents cognitive decline in rats caused by chemotherapy treatment. KU-32 works by inducing the heat shock response, which protects cells and may counteract the damaging effects of hydrogen peroxide.
American Cancer Society, National Institutes of Health

Contact: Brendan M. Lynch
brendan@ku.edu
785-864-8855
University of Kansas

Public Release: 5-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Seaweed: From superfood to superconductor
Seaweed, the edible algae with a long history in some Asian cuisines, and which has also become part of the Western foodie culture, could turn out to be an essential ingredient in another trend: the development of more sustainable ways to power our devices. Researchers report at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society progress toward a seaweed-derived material to help boost the performance of superconductors, lithium-ion batteries and fuel cells.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 5-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Addictive nut's derivatives could help smokers break the nicotine habit
As many as 600 million people in Asia chew areca nuts with betel leaves, sometimes adding tobacco leaves. Many users are addicted to this harmful preparation, which can create a sense of euphoria. Yet researchers have now discovered that compounds derived from the nut could help cigarette smokers -- as well as betel quid chewers -- kick their habits. They present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 5-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Green laser light probes metals for hidden damage (animation)
Imagine being able to check the structural integrity of an airplane, ship or bridge, without having to dismantle it or remove any material for testing, which could further compromise the structure. That's the promise of a new laser-based technique that chemists are developing to reveal hidden damage in metals. They present their work at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 4-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Stopping Zika from crossing the placenta
Although the World Health Organization ended its global health emergency on Zika last November, the virus could still make a comeback this summer. Researchers report today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society that they may have figured out how this virus invades the placenta, where it can cause birth defects, and they are taking steps to develop strategies that block its access.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 4-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Bio-sensing contact lens could someday measure blood glucose, other bodily functions
Transparent biosensors embedded into contact lenses could soon allow doctors and patients to monitor blood glucose levels and a host of other telltale signs of disease without invasive tests. Scientists say the bio-sensing lenses also could potentially be used to track drug use or serve an early detection system for cancer and other serious medical conditions. The researchers will present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 4-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Hair strands could reveal lifestyle secrets of criminals (video)
Hair fiber analysis, a forensic crime tool with a questionable past, could soon have a brighter future. That's thanks to the development of a more refined scientific technique, which could reveal much about a person's lifestyle, such as body mass, diet and exercise habits. These characteristics could then help investigators hone in on potential suspects. They present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 4-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Materials may lead to self-healing smartphones
Taking a cue from the Marvel Universe, researchers report that they have developed a self-healing polymeric material with an eye toward electronics and soft robotics that can repair themselves. The material is stretchable and transparent, conducts ions to generate current and could one day help your broken smartphone go back together again. The researchers will present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 3-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Ridding the oceans of plastics by turning the waste into valuable fuel
Billions of pounds of plastic waste are littering the world's oceans. Now, a Ph.D. organic chemist and a sailboat captain report that they are developing a process to reuse certain plastics, transforming them from worthless trash into a valuable diesel fuel with a small mobile reactor that could operate on land or at sea. They will present their work at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 3-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Altering the immune system to reverse paralysis (video)
In the ultimate betrayal, one's own immune system can turn against the protective sheath that envelops neurons in the brain, leaving the body paralyzed. Researchers have developed an experimental treatment that tames the wayward immune system in rodents, returning the power of movement to paralyzed mice. The approach may someday combat autoimmune diseases in humans. The researchers will present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 3-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Can pure maple syrup help reduce chronic inflammation?
The first-ever global symposium, solely dedicated to sharing the latest scientific discoveries on the potential health benefits of 100 percent pure maple products from Canada, took place on April 2 in San Francisco at the 253rd annual meeting of the American Chemical Society (ACS).
Federation of Quebec Maple Syrup Producers

Contact: Blake Mirzayan
blake.mirzayan@padillaco.com
804-675-8195
PadillaCRT

Public Release: 3-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
'Sniffing' urine to detect prostate cancer could prevent unnecessary biopsies
On the list of dreaded medical tests, a prostate biopsy probably ranks fairly high. The procedure requires sticking a needle into the prostate gland to remove tissue samples, and the majority of men who undergo the uncomfortable test don't require treatment. Today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, scientists report progress toward minimizing unnecessary prostate biopsies: They have identified the molecules likely responsible for the scent of prostate cancer.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 3-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
A 'bionic leaf' could help feed the world
In the second half of the 20th century, an agricultural boom called the 'green revolution' was largely credited with averting a global food crisis. Now, the problem of feeding the world's growing population looms again. To help address the challenge, researchers present at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society a 'bionic' leaf that uses bacteria, sunlight, water and air to make fertilizer in the very soil where crops are grown.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 3-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Smoking hot: UC study finds heat of hookah pipe the biggest health culprit for smokers
Hookah-tobacco users might want to rethink how they heat up their water pipes, based on research by chemists at the University of Cincinnati. Tobacco in hookah pipes is normally burned with specially made charcoal briquettes, which can contain heavy metals or other toxins. But a study by the University of Cincinnati found that a popular alternative -- electric heating disks sold in most tobacco shops -- might be far more harmful to your health.

Contact: Michael Miller
michael.miller3@uc.edu
513-556-6757
University of Cincinnati

Public Release: 3-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
How to clamp down on cyanide fishing
Spraying cyanide in tropical seas can quickly and cheaply stun fish, allowing them to be easily captured and sold. But most countries where aquarium fish are collected have outlawed the method, which damages corals. Catching perpetrators, however, is difficult. Now researchers are developing a handheld device for detecting cyanide fishing that could help clamp down on the destructive practice. They're reporting their work at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 2-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Upcycling 'fast fashion' to reduce waste and pollution
The fashion industry and environmentalists are old foes, and the advent of 'fast fashion' has strained the relationship even more. But what if we could recycle clothes like we recycle paper, or even upcycle them? Scientists at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society report today new progress toward that goal.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 2-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
'Peeling the onion' to get rid of odors near wastewater treatment plants
Nuisance smells from sewage and wastewater treatment facilities are a worldwide problem. Finding and eliminating the sources of such unpleasant odors can be difficult. However, scientists have now developed a system to sample, measure, categorize and control these smells and are applying it worldwide. They present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 2-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Making a 'beeline' past the blood-brain barrier for drug delivery
Most medicines can't get through the blood-brain barrier, but certain peptides in animal venoms can navigate across it to inflict damage. Now, researchers are capitalizing on venomous sneak attacks by developing a strategy based on a bee-venom peptide, apamin, to deliver medications to the brain. The researchers will present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 2-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
No more 'superbugs'? Maple syrup extract enhances antibiotic action
Antibiotics save lives, but there is a downside to their ubiquity. High doses can kill healthy cells along with bacteria, while also spurring the creation of 'superbugs' that don't respond to known antibiotics. Now, researchers report a natural way that could reduce antibiotic use without sacrificing health: a maple syrup extract that increases the potency of these medicines. They present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 2-Apr-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
A beach lover's dream: A step toward long-lasting sunscreen
In a perfect world, people would diligently reapply suncreen every couple of hours to protect their skin from damaging solar radiation. But few people actually adhere to reapplication guidelines, and those who do hardly relish the task. To develop longer-lasting sunscreens, researchers are trying to answer a basic question: How do sunblock ingredients work? The researchers will present their work today at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 31-Mar-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Caddisworm silk, DNA sleuths, urban streams and more from the University of Utah at ACS
University of Utah chemists gather with their peers in San Francisco next week at the American Chemical Society's National Meeting April 2-6. The theme of the meeting is 'Advanced Materials, Technologies, Systems & Processes.' Below are summaries of select presentations at the meeting, along with the time and date of the presentation and primary contact information. All times are in Pacific Daylight Time.

Contact: Paul Gabrielsen
paul.gabrielsen@utah.edu
801-505-8253
University of Utah

Public Release: 23-Mar-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Plenaries at American Chemical Society meeting focus on energy, materials, partnerships
Scientists, in four plenary talks, will explore a variety of subjects related to the 'Advanced Materials, Technologies, Systems & Processes' theme of the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place April 2 to 6 in San Francisco.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Mar-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Kavli Lectures: Physical chemistry of polymer networks, CRISPR systems for genome editing
Advances in understanding polymer networks and CRISPR-inspired genome engineering tools will be the topics of a pair of Kavli Lectures at the 253rd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society, the world's largest scientific society. The meeting will take place April 2 to 6 in San Francisco.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Mar-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
American Chemical Society national meeting features presidential events
American Chemical Society (ACS) President Allison A. Campbell, Ph.D., will focus on areas of significant importance -- the health of our planet, the safe practice of science and strong technical programming -- at the ACS 253rd National Meeting & Exposition, April 2-6, in San Francisco. The presidential events will be held at Hotel Nikko San Francisco, San Francisco Marriott Marquis and the Moscone Center. All times listed are in PDT.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 16-Feb-2017
American Chemical Society 253rd National Meeting & Exposition
Press registration for the 2017 American Chemical Society spring national meeting
Journalists registering for the American Chemical Society's 253rd National Meeting & Exposition this spring will have a wealth of new scientific information available for their news stories. More than 14,000 presentations are planned on a wide range of topics from health to the environment. The meeting, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year, will be held April 2-6 in San Francisco.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 1-25 out of 25.

[ 1 ]


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