Contacts:

ACS Press Center in Boston
Aug. 19-22, 2018
617-954-3960
newsroom@acs.org

Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
301-775-8455 (Cell)
k_cottingham@acs.org

A full range of media resources will be available to assist in your coverage of the 256th American Chemical Society national meeting, whether you are reporting onsite or from a remote location. There will be press releases and press conferences on abstracts chosen from more than 10,000 scientific presentations.

Watch live press conferences on YouTube, Monday, Aug. 20 through Wednesday, Aug. 22. Anyone can view the briefings, but to chat, you must first sign in with a Google account.

Modern chemistry is a multi-disciplinary science, and the Boston meeting will include newsworthy topics spanning science's horizons. Thousands of scientists and others from around the world are expected to attend.

The American Chemical Society, the world’s largest scientific society, is a not-for-profit organization chartered by the U.S. Congress. ACS is a global leader in providing access to chemistry-related information and research through its multiple databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. ACS does not conduct research, but publishes and publicizes peer-reviewed scientific studies. Its main offices are in Washington, D.C., and Columbus, Ohio.

To automatically receive news releases from the American Chemical Society, contact newsroom@acs.org.

 

 

 

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Key: Meeting M      Journal J      Funder F

Showing releases 1-24 out of 24.

[ 1 ]

Research News Release

Public Release: 22-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Biomaterial could keep tooth alive after root canal (video)
A root canal ranks high on most people's list of dreaded dental procedures, and it results in a dead tooth susceptible to further decay. Now scientists have developed a peptide hydrogel designed to regenerate dental pulp after a root canal, preserving the tooth. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 22-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
These lithium-ion batteries can't catch fire because they harden on impact
Lithium-ion batteries used in consumer electronics are notorious for bursting into flame when damaged. These incidents occasionally have grave consequences, ranging from burns to house fires to the crash of an airplane. Inspired by the weird behavior of some liquids that solidify on impact, researchers have developed a practical and inexpensive method to prevent these fires. They will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Bringing salvaged wooden ships and artifacts back to life with 'smart' nanotech
When a shipwreck is brought up from the sea depths, the wood quickly starts deteriorating. Scientists are reporting a novel way to use 'smart' nanocomposites to conserve a 16th-century British warship, the Mary Rose, and its artifacts. The new approach could help preserve other salvaged ships by eliminating harmful acids without damaging the wooden structures themselves. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Water bottles, other recycled 3D printing materials could avoid military supply snags
Soldiers on the battlefield or at remote bases often have to wait weeks for vital replacement parts. Now scientists report they have found a way to fabricate many of these parts within hours under combat conditions using water bottles, cardboard and other recyclable materials found on base as starting materials for 3D printing. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Gut bacteria provide key to making universal blood (video)
Blood banks around the world are continually in need of type O blood, which can be universally administered in an emergency. Researchers have identified an enzyme that converts A- and B-type blood to O with 30 times more efficiency than previously studied enzymes. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Nanobot pumps destroy nerve agents
Once in the territory of science fiction, 'nanobots' are closer than ever to becoming a reality, with possible applications in medicine, manufacturing, robotics and fluidics. Today, scientists report progress in developing the tiny machines: They have made nanobot pumps that destroy nerve agents, while simultaneously administering an antidote. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 21-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Portable freshwater harvester could draw up to 10 gallons per hour from the air
For thousands of years, people in the Middle East and South America have extracted water from the air to help sustain their populations. Drawing inspiration from those examples, researchers are now developing a lightweight, battery-powered freshwater harvester that could someday take as much as 10 gallons per hour from the air, even in arid locations. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Saliva could influence taste preferences
Saliva is crucial for tasting and digesting food. But scientists have now found that saliva could also be part of a feedback loop that influences how food tastes to people -- and by extension, what foods they're willing to eat. They hope that, one day, the findings could help consumers stick to a healthier diet. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
A new generation of artificial retinas based on 2D materials
Scientists report they have successfully developed and tested the world's first ultrathin artificial retina that could vastly improve on existing implantable visualization technology for the blind. The flexible 2-D material-based device could someday restore sight to the millions of people with retinal diseases. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
E-cigarettes can damage DNA
The popularity of electronic cigarettes continues to grow worldwide, as many people view them as a safer alternative to smoking. But the long-term effects of e-cigarette usage, commonly called 'vaping,' are unknown. Today, researchers report that vaping may modify the genetic material, or DNA, in the oral cells of users, which could increase their cancer risk. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
New drug could prevent debilitating side effect of cancer treatment
About 50,000 people in the US are diagnosed annually with head, neck, nasal and oral cancers. Most are treated with radiation, and of those, 70-80 percent develop a painful and debilitating side effect called severe oral mucositis. Researchers will present their results on a new drug that could potentially prevent the condition today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Maple leaf extract could nip skin wrinkles in the bud
Maple trees are best known for their maple syrup and lovely fall foliage. But it turns out that the beauty of those leaves could be skin-deep -- and that's a good thing. Today, scientists report that an extract from the leaves may prevent wrinkles. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Illicit drug use could be higher than previously thought; soars during special events
America's drug problem may be even worse than officials realize. And illicit drugs are consumed at a higher rate during celebratory events. Those are just two of the conclusions scientists have drawn from recent studies of drug residues in sewage. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Next-gen insect repellents to combat mosquito-borne diseases (video)
Nearly 700 million people suffer from mosquito-borne diseases -- such as malaria, West Nile, Zika and dengue fever -- each year, resulting in more than 1 million deaths. Today, researchers report a new class of mosquito repellents based on naturally occurring compounds that are effective in repelling the bugs, including those that are resistant to pyrethroid insecticides and repellents. The researchers present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 20-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Strawberries could help reduce harmful inflammation in the colon
Inflammatory bowel disease is a set of painful conditions that can cause severe diarrhea and fatigue. Researchers are now reporting that a simple dietary intervention could mitigate colonic inflammation and improve gut health. In this case, a strawberry -- or rather, less than a cupful of strawberries -- a day could help keep the doctor away. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
A paper battery powered by bacteria
In remote areas of the world, everyday items like electrical outlets and batteries are luxuries. Health care workers in these areas often lack electricity to power diagnostic devices, and commercial batteries may be too expensive. Today, researchers report a new type of battery -- made of paper and fueled by bacteria -- that could overcome these challenges. The researchers will present their results at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
The environmental cost of contact lenses
Many people rely on contact lenses to improve their vision. But these sight-correcting devices don't last forever and they are eventually disposed of in various ways. Now, scientists are reporting that throwing these lenses down the drain at the end of their use could be contributing to microplastic pollution in waterways. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham, Ph.D.
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 19-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Weaponizing oxygen to kill infections and disease
The life-threatening bacteria MRSA can cripple a medical facility since it is resistant to treatment. But scientists report that they are now making advances in a new technique that avoids antibiotics, instead using light to activate oxygen, which wipes out bacteria. The method also could be used to treat other microbial infections, and possibly even cancer. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Book Announcement

Public Release: 19-Jul-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Women chemistry professors discuss motherhood and career in new book
When is the right time? How can I meet the demands of a professorship whilst caring for a young family? Choosing to become a mother has a profound effect on the career path of women holding academic positions, especially in the physical sciences.

Contact: Elizabeth Hawkins
elizabeth.hawkins@springer.com
49-622-148-78130
Springer

Award Announcement

Public Release: 27-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Dr. Anthony Lequerica receives 2018 Dr. Joshua B. Cantor Scholar Award
Anthony Lequerica, PhD, is the recipient of the 2018 Dr. Joshua B. Cantor Scholar Award.

Contact: Laura Viglione
lviglione@kesslerfoundation.org
973-323-3675
Kessler Foundation

Public Release: 19-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Talented 12: Chemical & Engineering News announces its 2018 rising stars in chemistry
Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society (ACS), is today unveiling its annual 'Talented 12' list. This award program, now in its fourth year, and for the first time sponsored by Thermo Fisher Scientific, recognizes young global stars in the chemical sciences. They will be announced at an event today at ACS' 256th National Meeting & Exposition, and they will be featured in this week's issue of C&EN.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Meeting Announcement

Public Release: 2-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Nanoscience and the future of healthcare kick off first day of ACS national meeting in Boston
The profound impact of nanoscience and chemistry on the future of healthcare will be explored in the opening session of the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 256th National Meeting & Exposition, Aug. 19-23 in Boston. ACS President Peter K. Dorhout, Ph.D., is cosponsoring the session, which will set the stage for the meeting's theme of "Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond."

Contact: Joan Coyle
j_coyle@acs.org
202-872-6229
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 10-Jul-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Highlights for news media at 2018 American Chemical Society national meeting in Boston
Journalists who register for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 256th National Meeting & Exposition in Boston will have access to more than 10,000 presentations on the meeting's theme, 'Nanoscience, Nanotechnology & Beyond,' and many more topics, including food and nutrition, medicine, health, energy and the environment. The meeting, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year, will be held August 19-23 in Boston.

Contact: Elizabeth Zubritsky
e_zubritsky@acs.org
202-872-8061
American Chemical Society

Public Release: 30-May-2018
American Chemical Society 256th National Meeting
Press registration opens for 2018 fall national meeting of the American Chemical Society
Journalists may now apply for press credentials for the American Chemical Society's (ACS') 256th National Meeting & Exposition, one of the largest scientific conferences of the year, at http://www.xpressreg.net/register/acsf0818/media/start.asp. The meeting will be held Aug. 19-23, 2018, in Boston.

Contact: Elizabeth Zubritsky
e_zubritsky@acs.org
202-872-8061
American Chemical Society

Press Conference

Public Release: 22-Aug-2018
American Chemical Society's 256th National Meeting & Exposition press conference schedule
Attend press conferences live - online at http://bit.ly/ACSLive_Boston2018 or in person -- at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. Press conferences will be held Monday, Aug. 20, through Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018. Below is the schedule, which will be updated as needed.

Contact: Katie Cottingham
k_cottingham@acs.org
301-775-8455
American Chemical Society

Showing releases 1-24 out of 24.

[ 1 ]


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